My Photoblitz!

When I first saw the photoblitz, I thought to myself, “How the hell am I supposed to do all of this in 20 minutes? It’s 10:30 in the morning, society is barely awake.” As I studied the list, I soon realized that this is actually pretty doable. Everything that was asked of me I could do within 5 minutes, give or take. And I did.

Doing the photos, I felt like I was running out of time. I was constantly thinking, “Is the 20 minutes up? Did I get everything?” over and over again. However every time I managed to pick a topic, figure out what photo to take, take the photo, and look back at my computer, I was actually really good with time. Incredibly good with time actually. Each photo really didn’t take longer than 1 minute. Some photos took me only a couple seconds to get. The only photo that took me the longest was the crowd. I knew classes were coming out at 10:45 am, and when I finished the first 6 photos, I had to wait a couple of minutes for the last one. When classes let out, I took multiple photos, but the one with the most crowd was the one I chose below, though at the same time it was practically the worst one I did take. In the end, I did this all literally in the same spot. This was a lot easier than I thought, though I wish I wasn’t so freaked out about time because then I would’ve taken nicer photos. I blame my anxiety for that.

These are my thought process through each of the photos I took:

  • Get close! Photograph an ordinary object from as close as you can manage: The first thing I saw was my computer case. I thought this would be really nice to have a close up on, so that’s what I did. So that people had a better view on what the case looked like without it being zoomed in on, I put the full picture of my case next to it.
  • Crowd scene: I waited for what felt like a really long time for this one, but I decided to do a picture of students leaving their classes at 10:45 am. I got a couple, but none showed the amount of students I took in the picture below (though it’s a little hidden, looking at it now).
  • Let’s play with movement. Get a shot of something in motion: I decided to do students walking down the UC steps, since this was the only motion happening around me. In this photo, I liked how I got the students reaching for the next step, so it kind of looks like they’re holding their feet slightly in the air.
  • Forced perspective – make something small look big, or big look small: I saw the big posters on the wall, and I thought putting it next to my small computer screen would be a good idea. In my opinion, the posters do look like a smaller paper when compared to my computer screen.
  • Power plugs are ubiquitous. Can you make a creative photo of such a common thing? : I know that couches/chairs are something that is in my everyday life, and they were all around me. I decided to take a picture of a couch, but to make it more creative than just something random, I flipped the camera upside down so the photo was in a different perspective. I actually really like the way this photo came out.
  • Contrast between an object and its shadow can make an interesting photo: The day I did this, it was the ONE cloudy day that we’ve had in a couple weeks. So I couldn’t take a cool picture of the sun’s affect with shadows on things like people and buildings. So, I noticed that there was a shadow underneath all the couches and chairs and such indicating the place that the light from inside the building cannot reach. While getting down to take the photo, I realized how cool it looks for it to be so dark on one spot but so bright in another.
  • Take a photo that emphasizes the detail of a human hand: Lucky, I do have a hand to take a photo of. I took the picture facing the light outside, so the picture could get all the dips and lines in my hand.
Start time
Computer case of my computer (as a reference)
Close up of case for my computer
Crowd Photo
Movement Photo
Forced Perspective
A photo of a couch, upside-down
Shadow under the couch
Picture of my hand, close up
End Time

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *